Trump fires off stealth response when asked controversial question on taking down pedophile rings


President Donald Trump deftly handled a question about a controversial movement during a press conference on Wednesday in relation to rumors and reports his administration is working behind the scenes to take down pedophile rings within the U.S.

A female reporter noted that “during the pandemic,” the QAnon movement appeared “to be gaining a lot a followers” before asking the president what he thought about it and what had “has to say to people” following it.

“Well, I don’t know much about the movement other than I understand they like me very much, which I appreciate,” Trump began. “But I don’t know much about the movement.”

“I have heard that it is gaining in popularity and from what I hear these are people that when they watch the streets of Portland (Oregon), when they watch what happened in New York City in just the last six or seven months … these are people that don’t like seeing what’s going on” in those places, the president said, noting that the movement started shortly after he got to the White House.

“I’ve heard these are people that love our country and they just don’t like seeing” what’s been happening around the country, Trump continued. “So, I don’t know anything about it other than they do supposedly like me, and they would also like to see problems in these areas … go away because there’s no reason the Democrats can’t run a city.”

The reporter had a follow-up question, and the answer the president gave was revealing for what he did not say.

“The crux of the theory is this belief that you are secretly saving the world from this satanic cult of pedophiles and cannibals. Does that sound like something that you are behind?” the reporter asked.

“Well, I haven’t heard that. Is that supposed to be a bad thing or a good thing?” Trump said, to muted laughs among reporters. “If I can help save the world from problems, I’m willing to do it, I’m willing to put myself out there.”

The president went on to say that he was attempting to save the world and the U.S. from “radical Left” ideology, noting, “When this country’s gone the rest of the world would follow.”

Rumors about the pedophile rings and other satanic rituals, many of them allegedly involving Hollywood and entertainment notables, have been circulating on social media for months. But thus far, there has been no major announcements by the Justice Department regarding any arrests tied to the alleged rings.

Last month, Twitter purged at least 7,000 accounts identified as being tied to the QAnon movement, while limiting roughly 150,000 others, because it “has the potential to lead to offline harm,” the social media giant announced.

“We’ve been clear that we will take strong enforcement action on behavior that has the potential to lead to offline harm. In line with this approach, this week we are taking further action on so-called ‘QAnon’ activity across the service,” Twitter Safety noted.

“We will permanently suspend accounts Tweeting about these topics that we know are engaged in violations of our multi-account policy, coordinating abuse around individual victims, or are attempting to evade a previous suspension — something we’ve seen more of in recent weeks,” the safety team added.

As for the QAnon movement, Deborah Franklin, writing at The American Thinker, described it this way:

Q followers were prepared long in advance for the easing of hostilities with North Korea, the deflation of the mullahs of Iran, and the discovery of Ukraine as a hotbed of corruption for American politicians. They knew a great deal about Jeffrey Epstein’s activities before the public did and anticipate even more shocking revelations to come. As Q likes to say, “Future proves past.” As Q’s predictions come true, they lend retroactive credibility to the entire enterprise.

Q’s followers believe that Q is a military intelligence operation, the first of its kind, whose goal is to provide the public with secret information.

The movement certainly has its believers, and many believe President Trump is one of them. Several were upset when Twitter purged or targeted tens of thousands of suspected QAnon accounts last month.

Jon Dougherty

Staff Writer

Jon is a staff writer for BizPac Review with 30 years’ worth of reporting experience, as well as an author and U.S. Army veteran. He has a BA in political science from Ashford University and an MA in national security studies/intelligence analysis from American Military University.

Jon Dougherty

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