Karma hits activist who climbs statue and discovers the Law of Gravity


One of the leftists targeting the statue of King Louis IX of France took an accidental dive after attempting to scale the bronze symbol in Missouri.

The statue, located in front of the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park, has been at the center of a clash between those demanding it be removed and others who are standing against the efforts to erase the history of the city’s namesake, which has stood at the location for more than a century.

“This is a form of Divine Comedy,” a tweet sharing video of the man who “discovers the Law of Gravity” this weekend as he fell after trying to scale the statue which, standing on a granite pedestal is over 40 feet tall.

The would-be vandal made it nearly to the top of the pedestal before he fell. It was not clear from the video if he was injured though he appeared to clearly have felt the impact as he lay on the ground for a moment after crashing down.

Twitter users leveled brutal but fitting reactions to the stunt and its aftermath.

A few hundred protesters clashed at the statue over the weekend, with many praying at its base while leftists raged about removing the “Apotheosis of St. Louis,” the official name for the image of the man who was the king of France during the 13th century and also a Catholic saint.


(Source: KMOV-TV)

“This guy right here represents hate and we’re trying to create a city of love,” Umar Lee, who helped organize the protest against the statue, said, according to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “We’re trying to create a city where Black lives matter. We’re trying to create a city where there is no antisemitism or Islamophobia … this is not a symbol of our city in 2020.”

As many had gathered for a prayer vigil around the base of the statue, counter protesters disrupted their efforts with many clashes caught on video and in photos.

A priest who tried to explain the history of St. Louis was harassed while he spoke and a protester could apparently be heard threatening to attack the St. Louis Cathedral as well.

The Archdiocese of St. Louis released a statement on Sunday saying that the king of France was “an example of an imperfect man who strived to live a life modeled after the life of Jesus Christ.”

“For St. Louisans, he is a model for how we should care for our fellow citizen, and a namesake with whom we should be proud to identify,” the Archdiocese said. “We should not seek to erase history, but recognize and learn from it, while working to create new opportunities for our brothers and sisters.”

Frieda Powers

Senior Staff Writer
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Originally from New York, Powers graduated from New York University and eventually made her way to sunny South Florida where she has been writing for the BizPacReview team since 2015.

Frieda Powers

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