Black leaders see race in Arbery shooting; Tim Scott calls for anti-lynching laws, Atlanta mayor blames Trump


Get the latest BPR news delivered free to your inbox daily. SIGN UP HERE.


In case you were wondering when black leaders somewhere in the country would get around to blaming President Donald Trump for the killing of 25-year-old Ahmaud Arbery, it has happened.

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms, in what seems like a blatant attempt to stir up racial animosity, described Arbery’s February shooting death in Georgia as a “lynching,” adding that the president’s rhetoric gives people “permission to do it in an overt way.”

Her inflammatory comments came during an appearance on — where else? — CNN, just a few days after a white father and son were charged with shooting Arbery as he ran through a Georgia neighborhood.

“It’s 2020 and this was a lynching of an African-American man,” Bottoms said. “My heart goes out to the family.

“With the rhetoric we hear coming out of the White House, many who are prone to being racist are given permission to do it in an overt way we wouldn’t see in 2020,” she added.

And it would seem that some African-American Republicans, such as Tim Scott, R-SC, agree that this was a racially-motivated killing. As discussed during the Fox News segment below, Scott took to Twitter to express his outrage over the shooting, agreeing with the narrative that Arbery “was hunted down from a pickup truck and murdered in cold blood.”

WATCH:

He then called on Congress to pass symbolic “anti-lynching legislation.”

He rounded out his tweet-thread by invoking the imagery of Emmett Till, an African-American male who was killed at the age of 14 for allegedly flirting with a white female.

President Trump has never demonstrated overt or even subtle racism, but rather some of his comments have been taken way out of context by the media and by Democrats to accuse of him being racist.

In fact, Trump was asked about the killing Friday during an appearance on Fox News’ “Fox & Friends” morning show, where he described the event as “a heartbreaking thing.”

“I looked at a picture of that young man. He was in a tuxedo … I will say that that looks like a really good young guy,” the president added.

Of course, this was before new video footage of a young black male entering a house under construction who resembles Arbery was released as well — not that he did anything to deserve what happened to him. But the new footage does add another dimension to the incident that investigators say they are looking into.

The two suspects, Gregory and Travis McMichael, told police they believed that Arbery was the same person recorded by a security camera committing a break-in earlier. When they saw him running in February, the grabbed firearms and pursued him.

Gregory McMichael is a retired police officer.

***WARNING: Graphic***

When asked about the racial elements to the case, Trump said “justice getting done is the thing that solves that problem.”

Of course, it does. But what if the evidence doesn’t lead prosecutors to charge the two white men or what if the evidence leads to a charge but not a conviction? Will that be the fault of Trump’s “rhetoric” too?

And wasn’t the “lynching” comment over the top? Some black leaders and notable figures think so, including conservative commentator Candace Owens.

 

As for the McMichaels, there has been no evidence presented thus far that their actions were racially motivated. That said, the felony murder charges filed against them “mean that a victim was killed during the commission of an underlying felony, in this case aggravated assault,” which occurred during the act and resultant struggle for the firearm that likely killed Arbery.

The charge doesn’t require an intent to kill. Murder convictions in Georgia carry with them a minimum sentence of life in prison, with or without parole.

During her interview, Bottoms remained fixated on Trump.

“I have four kids, three of whom are African-American boys,” she said. “They are angry and afraid and it speaks to the need to have leadership at the top who respects all communities in words and deeds as well.”

Latest posts by Jon Dougherty (see all)






Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *